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This article was published on February 18, 2008


    LinkBlip makes your digital life easier by tracking links

    LinkBlip makes your digital life easier by tracking links
    Ernst-Jan Pfauth
    Story by

    Ernst-Jan Pfauth

    Ernst-Jan Pfauth is the former Editor in Chief of Internet at NRC Handelsblad, as well as an acclaimed technology author and columnist. He a Ernst-Jan Pfauth is the former Editor in Chief of Internet at NRC Handelsblad, as well as an acclaimed technology author and columnist. He also served as The Next Web’s blog’s first blogger and Editor in Chief, back in 2008. At De Correspondent, Ernst-Jan serves as publisher, fostering the expansion of the platform.

    A 25-year old web developer from Seattle just made my life as a blogger somewhat easier. On a daily basis I send out approximately ten emails with questions, meant for CEO’s, fellow bloggers and entrepreneurs, you name it. Because they’re all suffering from the information overload, some emails might be left unanswered. There’s of course the build-in read notification, yet it’s generally experienced as annoying and it creates a weird feeling of obligation. Now this guy from Seattle, Matthew Inman, created a service that makes it possible to monitor links I’ve send out.

    In just six hours he built LinkBlip, a service that generates a trackable link. Just copy/paste it in your email and you’ll receive an email when the recipient has clicked on it. Now you at least know whether the unanswered email was seen by the recipient or not. Moreover, you know where he or she is based. It looks something like this:

    linkblip

    There’s one downside to this service. The evil-minded now have a new way to bully someone with a enormous load of emails. All they have to do is submit the email addresses of potential victim and then post it on Twitter or something like that. Maybe Matthew will sacrifice one more hour of his spare time to build some sort of security measurement.

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