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This article was published on August 4, 2008

    Is your wireless network a tool for terrorists?

    Is your wireless network a tool for terrorists?
    Ernst-Jan Pfauth
    Story by

    Ernst-Jan Pfauth

    Ernst-Jan Pfauth is the former Editor in Chief of Internet at NRC Handelsblad, as well as an acclaimed technology author and columnist. He a Ernst-Jan Pfauth is the former Editor in Chief of Internet at NRC Handelsblad, as well as an acclaimed technology author and columnist. He also served as The Next Web’s blog’s first blogger and Editor in Chief, back in 2008. At De Correspondent, Ernst-Jan serves as publisher, fostering the expansion of the platform.

    You might support an obscure terrorist clan without even knowing it. Ok, I know this sounds a bit like propaganda from the Bush administration. But it actually happened to 48-year-old American expat Kenneth Haywood. He was just chilling in his apartment last week, when an anti-terrorist squad raided his house. These cops probably scared the living daylights out of him before they asked an explanation for emails sent by the Indian Mujahideen from his IP address.

    These Indian Mujahideen are a dangerous group from Mumbai who probably hacked Haywood’s wireless network. After communicating via this network, they killed 42 people with 22 separate bombs in Ahmedabad, India.

    The business consultant Haywood told the Hindustan Times that the technician who set up the web connection had insisted he wouldn’t change his default password. How easy do you want to make it for these fundamentalists?

    So if you’re sensitive to all this code orange/ red BS you might wanna have another look at your wireless network. If you’re not, check your network anyhow. Your neighbor might be using it for his torrent addiction…