Want to keep the TNW Conference vibe going?? Tickets for TNW2022 are available now >>

The heart of tech

This article was published on January 27, 2011

    Interactive Augmented Reality TV tested in Germany

    Interactive Augmented Reality TV tested in Germany
    Martin Bryant
    Story by

    Martin Bryant

    Founder

    Martin Bryant is founder of Big Revolution, where he helps tech companies refine their proposition and positioning, and develops high-qualit Martin Bryant is founder of Big Revolution, where he helps tech companies refine their proposition and positioning, and develops high-quality, compelling content for them. He previously served in several roles at TNW, including Editor-in-Chief. He left the company in April 2016 for pastures new.

    We’ve written a lot recently about how apps will transform TV, and it appears that the promise is starting to become reality. Augmented Reality browser app Junaio was used earlier this week by German science TV show Galileo to run an interactive quiz that viewers could participate with using their phones.

    The quiz provided multiple choice questions and to take part, users had to hold their phone cameras up to the TV screen and point them at the answer they wanted to select. Image recognition worked out which answer was being selected and a tap of the screen submitted it.

    After answering each question , users got instant feedback about whether they were right or wrong and the show’s producers could show instant on-screen stats about how players fared.

    There’s no word as to whether TV station ProSieben will repeat the exercise although it was reportedly a hit. Promoted well in advance, ratings for the show apparently increased to 14% in market share among the 14 to 49-year-old viewers during transmission.

    Using an AR app to create interactive TV experiences is an interesting addition to the real-world uses that the technology has become known for. Germany-based Metaio, the company behind Junaio, is now keen to see other TV producers trying the technology.

    You can see a video demo of the German TV experiment (after an ad) here.