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This article was published on November 25, 2015

Here’s how Volkswagen plans to fix its dodgy diesel engines

Amanda Connolly
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Amanda Connolly

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Amanda Connolly is a reporter for The Next Web, currently based in London. Originally from Ireland, Amanda previously worked in press and ed Amanda Connolly is a reporter for The Next Web, currently based in London. Originally from Ireland, Amanda previously worked in press and editorial at the Web Summit. She’s interested in all things tech, with a particular fondness for lifestyle and creative tech and the spaces where these intersect. Twitter

Car maker Volkswagen swallowed a hard truth earlier this year when it admitted there’s a fault in almost 11 million of its vehicles‘ engines that subsequently misreported their emissions levels.

Over two months later, the company has finally released a video explaining how it will be fixing the EA189 diesel engines that were affected.

Both the 1.6 and 2-litre versions of that engine type will be receiving a software update and have a plastic device called a flow transformer installed. That will work to balance the amount of air going to the car’s engine, which is what determines how much fuel the car needs at any given time.

VW had originally said it thought the issue could be resolved with an over-the-air software update but that no longer seems to be the case for these versions.

It says the updates will be relatively quick and should take no longer than 30 minutes. Volkswagen will begin the process of recalling vehicles to implement the fix in January 2016.

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