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This article was published on January 3, 2014


    Gracenote unveils its new Rhythm API to help music services with Internet radio and recommendations

    Gracenote unveils its new Rhythm API to help music services with Internet radio and recommendations Image by: David Ramos
    Nick Summers
    Story by

    Nick Summers

    Nick Summers is a technology journalist for The Next Web. He writes on all sorts of topics, although he has a passion for gadgets, apps and Nick Summers is a technology journalist for The Next Web. He writes on all sorts of topics, although he has a passion for gadgets, apps and video games in particular. You can reach him on Twitter, circle him on Google+ and connect with him on LinkedIn.

    Intuitive music discovery and accurate recommendations are notoriously tricky to implement in a music streaming service, which is where Gracenote help with its new Rhythm API.

    The platform gives developers access to a new set of music suggestion algorithms, which can then be weaved into apps and services that offer radio stations, or infinite playlists based on a specific artist, album, track or genre. Available next month, it will also support like and dislike controls, similar to Google Play Music All Access, and the ability to “dial-up” and “dial-down” popular artists for obscure or indie recommendations.

    Gracenote says it’ll be using its pool of music metadata – which spans over 180 million tracks – and feedback from its in-house team of music editors to power the new Rhythm API. The company currently handles over 550 million queries a day from listeners on a multitude of streaming services.

    Read Next: Tribune acquires Gracenote from Sony to create a media metadata powerhouse

    Image Credit: David Ramos/Getty Images