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This article was published on November 18, 2015


Google’s lowered app prices in the Play Store for 17 countries

Google’s lowered app prices in the Play Store for 17 countries
Amanda Connolly
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Amanda Connolly

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Amanda Connolly is a reporter for The Next Web, currently based in London. Originally from Ireland, Amanda previously worked in press and ed Amanda Connolly is a reporter for The Next Web, currently based in London. Originally from Ireland, Amanda previously worked in press and editorial at the Web Summit. She’s interested in all things tech, with a particular fondness for lifestyle and creative tech and the spaces where these intersect. Twitter

In an effort to make its apps more affordable for people worldwide, Google has lowered the minimum price of apps in the Play Store for 17 countries after testing the waters in India earlier this year.

India will continue to enjoy the the cheapest apps, with some costing as little 10 Rupees ($0.15). Turkey and the Ukraine are next, with prices starting at  $0.21. Before Google’s announcement to lower app prices in India in September, the cheapest apps in the region were 50 Rupees.

The top end of the app market is flat for businesses in these regions, the race is very much for the bottom.

You can see the full list of countries and their new minimum app prices below:

  • Brazil: R$ 0.99 ($0.26)
  • Chile: CLP $200.00 ($0.28)
  • Colombia: COP$ 800.00 ($0.26)
  • Hungary: Ft 125.00 ($0.43)
  • Indonesia: Rp 3,000.00 ($0.22)
  • Malaysia: RM 1.00 ($0.23)
  • Mexico: MXN$ 5.00 ($0.30)
  • Peru: PEN 0.99 ($0.30)
  • Philippines: ₱15.00 ($0.32)
  • Poland: zł1.79 ($0.45)
  • Russia: руб 15.00 ($0.23)
  • Saudi Arabia: SAR 0.99 ($0.26)
  • South Africa: R3.99 ($0.28)
  • Thailand: ฿10.00 ($0.28)
  • Turkey: ₺0.59 ($0.21)
  • Ukraine: ₴5.00 ($0.21)
  • Vietnam: ₫6,000 ($0.27)

Developers who want to adjust their app prices for these regions can do so in the Pricing and Distribution or In-app Products sections in Google Play’s Developer Console.

Similarly, Facebook announced yesterday that it’s partnered with Airtel Africa to bring free access to basic internet services to 17 countries in Africa through its Free Basics program.

It’s refreshing to see companies like Google and Facebook look beyond the money making markets to help bring people in every region online and connect us worldwide.

Android phones and devices remain the main source of getting online in developing markets so this is a smart and conscious move by Google to keep its place as the main player in these regions.

➤ Minimum purchase price for apps and in-app products reduced on Google Play [Google]

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