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This article was published on November 21, 2013

Google says its major services are 20% to 40% faster with SPDY than HTTPS

Google says its major services are 20% to 40% faster with SPDY than HTTPS
Emil Protalinski
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Emil Protalinski

Emil was a reporter for The Next Web between 2012 and 2014. Over the years, he has covered the tech industry for multiple publications, incl Emil was a reporter for The Next Web between 2012 and 2014. Over the years, he has covered the tech industry for multiple publications, including Ars Technica, Neowin, TechSpot, ZDNet, and CNET. Stay in touch via Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Google today revealed some performance benchmarks comparing four of its major services running on SPDY instead of HTTPS. The improvements in latency (measured as the time from first request byte to onload event in the browser) are massive for both users with fast connections and users with high round-trip times:

Screen Shot 2013-11-20 at 2.41.24 PM

The above results were measured using Chrome 29, comparing HTTPS versus SPDY for each site “across millions of real user sessions with various connectivity profiles.” SPDY, which is not an acronym but just a short version for the word “speedy,” is a protocol developed primarily at Google to improve browsing by forcing SSL encryption for all sites and speeding up page loads.

See also – Google tests data compression proxy feature to speed up Chrome for Android, like Opera Turbo and Amazon Silk and Google adds its experimental QUIC network protocol to latest Chrome build, delivering HTTP over UDP

Top Image Credit: craitza