The heart of tech

This article was published on July 13, 2010


French Supreme Court rules in Google’s favor on trademarked keywords cases

French Supreme Court rules in Google’s favor on trademarked keywords cases


Chad Catacchio
Story by

Chad Catacchio

Chad Catacchio is a contributor writing on a variety of topics in tech. He has held management positions at a number of tech companies in th Chad Catacchio is a contributor writing on a variety of topics in tech. He has held management positions at a number of tech companies in the US and China. Check out his personal blog to connect with him or follow him on Twitter (if you dare).

Amid all of the problems that Google has been having with European nations regarding its Street View cars capturing WiFi data (though this PR crisis has certainly not been constrained to Europe), there is some positive legal news for Google today on another Google service, Adwords. According to Google’s European Public Policy Blog, the French Supreme Court has ruled that advertisers in Europe can bid for keywords that are trademarked.

The European Court of Justice, Europe’s highest court, had already ruled in favor of Google back in March on a set of four cases involving keyword trade marks, but as the suit had originated in the France, the case had to be sent back to the French Supreme Court for a final ruling, which came down today in favor of Google.

The Google post goes on to say:

“In addition, the Court went beyond the European Court of Justice by excluding any act of unfair competition or misleading advertising by Google…. All cases that are judged by the Supreme Court are automatically referred to a French Court of Appeal. But the appeal court needs to apply today’s judgement.”

Here is a PDF of the court’s decision (in French).