Want to keep the TNW Conference vibe going?? Tickets for TNW2022 are available now >>

The heart of tech

This article was published on March 15, 2012

    FCC to advise new commission aiming to boost Internet penetration in classrooms

    FCC to advise new commission aiming to boost Internet penetration in classrooms
    Alex Wilhelm
    Story by

    Alex Wilhelm

    Alex Wilhelm is a San Francisco-based writer. You can find Alex on Twitter, and on Facebook. You can reach Alex via email at [email protected] Alex Wilhelm is a San Francisco-based writer. You can find Alex on Twitter, and on Facebook. You can reach Alex via email at [email protected]

    While WiFi in college classrooms is an issue for some, few could disagree that linking our public school rooms to the Internet is a bad idea. The global world requires digital skills of workers, making computing preparation critical for youths.

    Julius Genachowski, Chairman of the FCC, along with the Education Secretary Arne Duncan will advise a new commission that is working on that exact issue, by pushing for greater Internet access in classrooms, it has become known. Education Secretary Margaret Spellings along with Columbia University President Lee Bollinger comprise part of the commissions board. The organization is called ‘The Leading Education by Advancing Digital Commission,’ or LEAD, for short.

    For Duncan, this sort of project is not merely good policy, it is vital: “Technology isn’t an option that schools may or may not choose for their kids. Technological competency is a requirement for entry into the global economy — and the faster we embrace it, the more we maintain and secure our economic leadership in the 21st century.”

    According to the group’s website, their goal is as follows:

    The Commission will develop a blueprint detailing the opportunity for using technology as a catalyst to transform and improve American education. The LEAD Commission will incorporate input from a cross-section of teachers, parents, local government officials, school officials, students and education technology industry leaders and expects to release its findings and a blueprint for action in late 2012.

    In short, LEAD is going to draw up some plans. The mechanism that will bring that plan into action, and make a real impact is not clear at this time. However, given that the Department of Education is involved, it could be that the blueprint will guide future policy.

    For now, the government is advising a group that is working to build a plan that may advise the government. Try not to laugh.