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This article was published on February 28, 2013

Bing Maps adds 13M square kilometers of high-res data, better ocean mapping and reduced cloud interference

Bing Maps adds 13M square kilometers of high-res data, better ocean mapping and reduced cloud interference
Alex Wilhelm
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Alex Wilhelm

Alex Wilhelm is a San Francisco-based writer. You can find Alex on Twitter, and on Facebook. You can reach Alex via email at [email protected] Alex Wilhelm is a San Francisco-based writer. You can find Alex on Twitter, and on Facebook. You can reach Alex via email at [email protected]

This morning Bing Maps announced the addition of 13 million square kilometers of new satellite imagery to its database.

Bing Maps is not simply a component of Bing’s search product, but also lives as a stand-alone application in Windows 8, giving it a much higher profile than it might otherwise have. Given that, today’s updates should sharpen up its user experience. Mapping is not niche service, as Apple recently learned.

New data from TerraColor will enhance the most zoomed-out world viewing, and fresh information on certain locations will reduce cloud interference. After all, clouds are topographic noise in a map setting. A total of 13,799,276 square kilometers of “High Resolution Satellite imagery” have been added as well.

However, the neatest part of the update involves the ocean. What Microsoft calls “bathymetric imagery” provides a much better look at the geographic undulations that lie beneath the waves:

2013-02-28_10h29_08

Now you can scuba dive from your desk.

With the launch of Windows 8, Bing Maps has become the defacto atlas and globe for any youth with a new PC. The more data it has, the better.

Top Image Credit: Christopher Bulle