Inside money, markets, and Big Tech

This article was published on October 20, 2009


    #BeatCancer sets a worrying social media World Record

    #BeatCancer sets a worrying social media World Record
    Martin Bryant
    Story by

    Martin Bryant

    Founder

    Martin Bryant is founder of Big Revolution, where he helps tech companies refine their proposition and positioning, and develops high-qualit Martin Bryant is founder of Big Revolution, where he helps tech companies refine their proposition and positioning, and develops high-quality, compelling content for them. He previously served in several roles at TNW, including Editor-in-Chief. He left the company in April 2016 for pastures new.

    guinnes_world_recordSome great news today, turned only slightly sour by its possible repercussions.

    The Twitterverse was set alight over the weekend when attendees at the BlogWorld & New Media Expo sent tweets and Facebook status updates with the hashtag #BeatCancer.

    This wasn’t just some vague rallying call, this was about money. For every tweet featuring the hashtag,the initiative’s sponsors donated one US Cent to cancer charities.

    It was certainly a success; the tweets and status updates echoed across the web all weekend and it’s been announced today that #BeatCancer set a Guinness World Record for “Most widespread social network message in 24 hours”. Not only that but $70,000 was raised to be split between for charities.

    Don’t get me wrong, this is great. The money raised is wonderful – but that world record? You can just see the eyes of social media marketers around the world light up at the idea.

    How long before every two-bit promotional campaign is trying to increase “engagement” by trying to beat the world record? You can see the tweets already: “Tweet ‘#OurBrandname’ to help break the World Record for ‘Most widespread social network message in 24 hours'”.

    Of course, they’ll mostly fail; most people will happily retweet a hashtag to raise money for charity but will see through commercial attempts to copy the idea. Still, I can imagine enough people would retweet this spam for it to become an annoyance and a trending topic.

    Grumpiness aside, congratulations to Everywhere, the agency behind the campaign, and the charities who will benefit from the money raised.