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This article was published on October 16, 2014

    The BBC debuts Genome, a database covering all Radio Times listings from 1923 to 2009

    The BBC debuts Genome, a database covering all Radio Times listings from 1923 to 2009
    Nick Summers
    Story by

    Nick Summers

    Nick Summers is a technology journalist for The Next Web. He writes on all sorts of topics, although he has a passion for gadgets, apps and Nick Summers is a technology journalist for The Next Web. He writes on all sorts of topics, although he has a passion for gadgets, apps and video games in particular. You can reach him on Twitter, circle him on Google+ and connect with him on LinkedIn.

    The BBC is creating a complete archive of the scheduling for its radio and TV output.

    The Genome project covers the listings from every issue of the Radio Times, a weekly magazine in the UK which covers TV and radio scheduling, between 1923 and 2009. The BBC wants to include regional and national programming variations next, as well as the times it deviated from planned scheduling. (It happens an awful lot while Wimbledon is on.)

    Screen Shot 2014-10-16 at 09.49.41

    The database is available to the public and includes the programme name, cast details, transmission dates and times covering 4,469 copies of the Radio Times. The BBC is also encouraging users to contribute to the archive with their own edits, although the broadcaster will need to approve them individually.

    If you’ve ever been curious about what the BBC’s output and scheduling was like in prior decades, the Genome project should prove useful. Why does the database stop at 2009? The BBC says it began archiving information online from 2007, when it launched BBC iPlayer. All of that information is maintained here and the BBC plans to back-file the repository using Genome data.

    BBC Genome (via Blog Post)

    Top image credit: Gil C / Shutterstock.com