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This article was published on June 9, 2011


    Apple Backtracks On Its In-App Subscriptions Policy

    Apple Backtracks On Its In-App Subscriptions Policy
    Matt Brian
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    Matt Brian

    Matt is the former News Editor for The Next Web. You can follow him on Twitter, subscribe to his updates on Facebook and catch up with him Matt is the former News Editor for The Next Web. You can follow him on Twitter, subscribe to his updates on Facebook and catch up with him on Google+.

    With new updates coming to Apple’s iOS platform, the Cupertino-based company has reversed parts of its policy in regards to how its polices In-App Subscriptions on the App Store, removing some pricing guidelines completely, reports Macrumors.

    Apple has completely removed the the requirement that a subscription must be “same price or less than it is offered outside the app”, also removing the stipulation that external subscriptions must be also offered as an in-app purchase.

    This now clears the way for publishers and content providers to offer subscriptions using Apple’s subscription platform at any price and are no longer having to offer a subscription in their apps, just because they offer one outside of the App Store.

    Earlier this week we reported that the Financial Times had circumvented Apple’s 30% cut on publication subscriptions for iOS, abandon its native app and switching instead to a paid-for Web app, giving the company more control over how it prices its subscriptions.

    MacRumors has obtained a copy of the new terms, highlighting the changes in the In-App Subscriptions section:

    11.14 Apps can read or play approved content (specifically magazines, newspapers, books, audio, music, and video) that is subscribed to or purchased outside of the app, as long as there is no button or external link in the app to purchase the approved content. Apple will not receive any portion of the revenues for approved content that is subscribed to or purchased outside of the app.

    With the amended terms, existing music and video subscription services can provide apps without having to offer in-app purchases.

    Has Apple bucked under the pressure from publishers and upset consumers? It certainly looks like it.