Online learning site Udemy now has 2 million registered students and is adding 800 new courses each month

Online learning site Udemy now has 2 million registered students and is adding 800 new courses each month ...

Online learning marketplace Udemy has signed up its 2 millionth student, more than five months after it hit the 1 million milestone.

The company has also announced a few growth metrics that seem to indicate that its educational programs have mass appeal. Specifically, Udemy has seen 300 percent revenue growth in the past 12 months, but didn’t provide specific dollar figures. Additionally, it says that student course enrollments grew more than 400 percent in the same time frame.

The company did say that more students are enrolling in Udemy courses each day over the past four years: In 2010, that number was 24 and has increased to 9,061 in 2013. More than 800 new courses are also being published each month by instructors.

Dennis Yang, Udemy’s president and COO, said in a statement:

It’s gratifying to help so many students connect with new skills and passions, and witness individuals transform their professional path and livelihoods. We are very bullish about the future of our knowledge sharing model, where students can learn anything, anytime, anywhere, and experts can make money sharing their expertise.

Mobile devices appear to also be a success for students as Udemy’s iOS app has been downloaded nearly 1 million times.

In August, the company said that more than half of its students came from the US and had more than 600 courses available in Spanish and 150 in Portuguese. Today, it counts 1,500 international language courses in Spanish, German, Portuguese, Turkish, Chinese, French, Japanese, Italian, Russian, Korean, and Hindi.

Udemy operates within a crowded space of online educational platforms, competing against the likes of CourseraUdacity, Khan Academy, and others.

Photo credit: CATRINUS VAN DER VEEN/AFP/Getty Images

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