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Hey snoozy Susan, here’s how to stop falling asleep at work

Yessi Bello Perez
Story by
Yessi Bello Perez

Senior Writer, Growth QuartersYessi leads the writing efforts at TNW’s Growth Quarters. Yessi leads the writing efforts at TNW’s Growth Quarters.

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It’s 3pm on a Friday and you’ve had enough. Or maybe it’s just after 9am on a Monday and you’re struggling to get started, or even 12pm on a Tuesday and you’re falling asleep.

Sound familiar? If so, you’re probably used to the overwhelming struggle that is trying to stay awake at your desk when you really just want to fall asleep.

If it’s any consolation, you’re far from being alone. That’s why I’ve put together these few pointers to help you stay engaged, active, and awake while you’re at work.

[Read: The weirdo’s guide to WFH productivity: Sanity shower, squats, and snacks]

Get your steps in

Getting your morning routine right will undoubtedly set you up for a productive day and stop you from falling asleep.

Morning exercise is a good way of waking up your body and mind. If you can, go for a walk before you start work and get some fresh air.

You’ll feel more awake, and what’s even better, you’ll get your dreaded workout out of the way first thing.

Coffee isn’t the answer

Coffee is wonderful, it really is.

A good cup of the stuff can turn the worst of days into the best of days — but you shouldn’t abuse it.

If you’re going to be friends with caffeine, make sure you limit your intake because too much of it can leave you feeling lethargic.

I would recommend having one, or two (at most) cups of  in the morning and sticking to water for the rest of the day, which brings me on to my next point.

Stay hydrated

Water really is your best friend, especially when it comes to staying awake.

Dehydration can lead to fatigue because it impacts the flow of oxygen to the brain and can cause your heart to work harder to pump oxygen to all your organs, thus making you more tired and less alert.

Water can also help reduce stress. In fact, studies have show that dehydration can also lead to higher cortisol levels — the stress hormone — making it even harder to deal with daily problems.

You’ll need daylight

Natural daylight — or the lack of it — can have a huge impact on how you feel at work.

I used to work in a windowless office in a London co-working space and I’d find myself getting increasingly sleepy and restless throughout the day. I eventually realized this was mostly due to the lack of natural light — and it seems my conclusion wasn’t unfounded.

A study conducted by a US professor found that workers in day lit office environments reported an 84% drop in symptoms of eyestrain, headaches, and blurred vision symptoms all of which can detract from productivity and potentially lead to sleepiness.

Snack away

I don’t know about you but I used to experience an early afternoon drop in productivity and would start to fall asleep, particularly in the colder, drearier months — and then I started snacking.

It turns out this afternoon slump was probably caused by a drop in blood glucose levels and the good news is that I managed to solve this problem by keeping several healthy snacks within arm’s reach or just a short walk away.

Time yourself

Whether you’re working on an ongoing project or you want to tend to your overflowing inbox, own your productivity and hold yourself accountable by timing yourself.

Here’s a familiar scenario: You need to prepare a report by the end of the day but it’s 4PM and you’re struggling to stay awake. Stop what you’re doing, take a moment, breathe in, and set a timer on your phone. Give yourself a deadline and motivate yourself with the possibility of a nap once your work is submitted.

Get the hard stuff out of the way

Only you know when you feel more awake, so keep this at the forefront of your mind when you’re planning your day.

If you feel less sleepy in the morning, take care of the hardest, most boring tasks then and keep the fun stuff for later. If you’re more alert in the afternoon or evening, then save the most menial tasks until then.

There’s no hard science and if you’re fortunate enough to work somewhere that offers flexible working, you should use this to your advantage.

Let music be the food of love productivity

Lastly, but by no means least, I have to be honest with you: I can’t do anything without listening to music and while my taste may be questionable, that’s besides the point.

If you’re working from home or are lucky enough to have your own private office, why not sing along?

It’ll perk you up, you won’t fall asleep, and if you’re as bad a singer as I am, well, no one will hear you!

Published June 5, 2020 — 09:00 UTC