Pinterest today announced a sneak preview of a new tool called Interests. As its amazingly clever name implies, Interests lets users find pins they like based on topics they find, well, interesting.

To give the feature a whirl, visit Pinterest on your desktop browser and select “Preview! Explore Interests” in the categories menu. Pinterest plans to roll out the feature to all users, including mobile, “soon.”

2014012706 Pinterest launches Interests, a tool to let users explore topics and find pins they like

On Pinterest, categories can be as broad as All Travel or New York City. Previously, all of the pins on Pinterest were organized into just a handful of such categories.

Pinterest explains that each user’s Interests page will adjust based on your existing pins: the more you pin, the more changes you’ll see. That means you’re essentially getting customized recommendations, in addition to being able to explore more categories than before.

2014012705 Pinterest launches Interests, a tool to let users explore topics and find pins they like

“We’re working hard to make Pinterest as relevant as possible for each person so it can be a place you can find and save all of the things you love, even if you didn’t even know you were looking for them,” the company explains. “This is just the beginning of bringing you more great experiences for your unique interests.”

Pinterest says it has a lot planned for 2014, but at the top of its list is creating new ways to discover Pins. That makes sense: the easier the company can make it for its users to find more content to engage with, the more of them will keep coming back.

The company does emphasize that the feature is still just a preview, so you may see “a few interests here and there that aren’t quite your thing.” The company is taking feedback for Interests at its Help Center.

See also – Pinterest now sends you an email notification whenever one of your pins drops in price and Facebook’s referral traffic share grew over 48% in Q4 2013, Pinterest was up 30%, but Twitter dipped 4%

Top Image Credit: Karen Bleier/Getty Images