Wevorce, a technology platform aimed at making divorce cases more amicable, has opened up its service to the general public. Targeting attorneys, the company looks to take advantage of what it calls a $30 billion market for divorce-related services with the added goal of reducing the hostility and hurt so common during separation.

Launched last March at Y Combinator’s Winter 2013 Demo Day, Wevorce says that traditionally, divorce cases were often managed by mediation attorneys who had their own checklists and ad hoc processes. With Wevorce, the family will have a standardized checklist to help set the expectation right from the beginning. Through consultations with an attorney, a family counselor, and an accountant, each family will go through a six step process that covers all aspects of the case.

As families complete the divorce proceedings, Wevorce also catalogs and streamlines all related legal documents.

During the YC Demo Day, company founder and CEO Michelle Crosby said that Wevorce had 110 families use its service, 109 of which opted to not pursue their case in court and forgo a traditional court procedural altogether. Furthermore, it saw an 84 percent month-over-month growth rate. Crosby says that with its current success rate so high, she’s confident in her potential for success — so much so that Wevorce will pay attorney fees when an amicable solution cannot be reached.

Prior to today, Wevorce only had representatives in a few cities, including Seattle, WA, San Jose, CA, San Francisco, CA, Asheville, NC, Boise, ID, and Oakland, CA. However, assistance was also available online. Now it has opened up nationwide in the US.

One of the advantages that Wevorce claims to have is its low cost. On average, the company charges less than $10,000 — traditional divorce cases can start around $27,000.

Definitely not a common startup that you would normally read about, Wevorce is looking to take an unpopular subject and make it a bit more friendly.

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