Google has started to ramp up the selection of apps available for Google Glass after official apps for Facebook, Twitter, CNN, Elle, Evernote and Tumblr were released at Google I/O on Friday, but now there’s an easy way for almost anyone to create a dedicated Glass app.

New York-based developer Chris Maddern, who runs Applaunch and works for video startup Animoto, has released an open-source code that is effectively a template to create basic apps for any Web-based service, and with minimal fuss. In fact, Maddern says 15 minutes is all that it takes.

The code uses the Mirror API and is available from GitHub (here). It requires merely a few database tweaks — each of which Maddern spells out in the description — before an app that connects a Web service and Glass is born. From there, those with a spirit for adventure (and coding experience, of course) can add new features and advance the app as they see fit.

Importantly, all apps created will run Google’s Glassware system. That gives them full access to and interaction with Glass, unlike some other hacker creations, such as this cool app which takes photos using winks, which can only be deployed as APKs.

There will be more and Maddern tells TNW that, with version 1.0 now out, he is working on adding “more complex features”, which will include replying to and updating items, as well as including timelines.

Beyond that, he is aiming to make things even easier for code-averse folk. He has plans for a Web app that lets users create and edit Glass apps “without ever writing a line of code or seeing a Heroku terminal”.

The Glass development community is small (but dedicated) since just 2,000 devices have been sold at this pre-consumer launch point. Maddern is jumping in early, hoping that his efforts will allow people and companies to “kickstart” their focus on the spec-tacular new hardware from Google.

Google ran a number of ‘Glass Foundry’ developer events which have helped get a number of apps out into the world already, while others have sprouted from enthusiasts.

We may not all be in a position to be full-time Glassholes right now, but the barriers  to creating apps are dropping to allow more people and businesses to bring content to the platform. Many will likely wait for Glass to go mainstream before devoting resources, but this code is an interesting and easy way to experiment early on.

The code is fresh out thus there are no apps built from it yet. But those seeking an example can check out this unofficial Facebook app that Maddern developed while working on the code last week.

➤ Google Glass Mirror Ruby Sinatra Scaffold on Github

Related: Google’s Glass fireside chat: Ugly prototypes, privacy and its potential to go mainstream

Headline image via Justin Sullivan/Getty Images