Business and brands in Asia that are keen to harness the potential of social media have a new option after Synthesio, a social media monitoring service originally from France, expanded into the continent by opening an office in Singapore.

The company — which was founded in 2006 and has offices in Paris, London and New York — says that the move to Asia comes in response to demand from global clients that want to take their working relationship with the company into new markets.

“The Singapore office will provide our global client base with exceptional support in Asia. It is part of our plan to provide a truly global service by having a presence in every major commercial market,” commented CEO and co-founder Loic Moisand.

Synthesio uses a sentiment and ranking system to help its customers filter online conversations and sites for insight, to identify influencers, target new audiences and consumer markets, and more. The company offers a combination of monitoring dashboards and engagement platforms to help brands glean intelligence from the Web.

The company also provides more general services, such as counsel, training and a range of bespoke reports that cover online brand audits, crises, ad campaigns and more.

The company boasts a range of well-known global brands as customers — including Microsoft, Vodafone, BlackBerry and McDonalds — and it has revealed that its initial roster of customers served out of Singapore will include Procter & Gamble, Saatchi & Saatchi Singapore and others.

Synthesio raised a $2 million Series A round from French VC Entrepreneur Venture in 2011 to help accelerate its international growth. The company previously landed two smaller seed-stage investments in 2006 and 2007.

Singapore is home to a number of social media specialists already. Singapore’s own Brandtology sold a majority stake of its business to Australian media research group Media Monitors in 2011, while the region has a large number of PR agencies with dedicated social practices, such as Ogilvy and Burston Marsteller.

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