Cloud-based email service SendGrid is now claiming it delivers more than seven billion emails per month, representing 1% of all emails sent globally (not including spam).

Since its inception three years ago, SendGrid has set out to solve the challenge of email delivery for businesses, with a cloud-based platform designed to “increase email deliverability”. Its platform is used by more than 100,000 Web app companies and developers, such as Foursquare, Pinterest, Airbnb, Spotify and Pandora. Indeed, just last month SendGrid teamed up with Twilio to offer email, SMS, voice and push notifications for enterprises.

More than 80 billion emails have been sent through SendGrid to date, the majority of which are transactional, though it also offers an solution for businesses that replaces their existing SMTP infrastructure.

SendGrid hits Europe

To mark this latest milestone, SendGrid is also announcing that it’s expanding into Europe with new offices in the UK and Germany, adding to its current US-based hubs in Boulder, Denver, San Francisco, New York, and Anaheim. The UK office is in London’s Shoreditch area, while the German hub is in Frankfurt, though Developer Evangelist Martyn Davies will be covering Berlin too.

“2012 was an incredible year for us,” says Jim Franklin, CEO of SendGrid. “We hit a number of remarkable milestones including nearly tripling the total volume of emails we delivered year-over-year and the volume we deliver monthly. We’re expecting very strong growth for 2013.”

“Demand for our platform from international markets has been on a steep and steady increase for some time and we’ve now reached the stage where expanding our physical presence into Europe just makes sense,” he continues. “We’ll be a much more visible presence on the conference and events circuit in Europe in the coming months.”

Founded in 2009 after graduating from TechStars in Boulder, Colorado, SendGrid is backed by Foundry Group, Highway 12 Ventures, Bessemer Venture Partners and several other individual investors.

Feature Image Credit – Thinkstock