As we’ve said before, infographics have quickly become the bane of the Web since exploding in popularity over the past year. The amount of poor designs and empty stats out there are enough to make you cringe, but that’s because infographics aren’t any different from any other sort of design; there’s good and bad work out there, and the latter always outweighs the former. In other words, the average website isn’t beautiful or useful, but that doesn’t mean the gems aren’t worth it.

Truly high-quality infographics require talent, and Visually knows this well. That’s why the company is today launching a new marketplace to put its community of 45,000+ designers to work, with the goal of transforming the world’s big data into easily consumed visualizations.

The price for this task depends on if you just need design, storytelling, etc, but at its most basic level, the flat rate starts at $1,495 and will get you something along the lines of this:

Screen Shot 2012 10 17 at 10.13.18 AM 520x285 Visually launches a marketplace to put its community of 45,000 infographic designers to workView full size here.

Interestingly, this isn’t just a highly controlled talent pool for hire. Visually has created a specialized project management dashboard that lets the designer and client share files and track progress. Visually tells us that “This includes the ability to upload and approve drafts, share feedback and track the progress of the project in real-time. The system even creates a program timeline and sends alerts when due dates are approaching to ensure projects come in on time and on budget.”

Right now, the Visually Marketplace is in public beta, and only supports static infographics, but support for interactive and motion graphics, access to third-party data feeds will arrive in the “coming months.”

Regardless of how you feel about infographics, Visually certainly has a lot of talent to choose from, and hopefully the company has only selected the best to ensure only great work comes out of it.

➤ Visually Marketplace

Image credit: Thinkstock