Got questions for a tech titan? Women Who Tech’s Allyson Kapin is joining us on TNW Answers

Got questions for a tech titan? Women Who Tech’s Allyson Kapin is joining us on TNW Answers

What is the future of digital activism? How can I increase awareness of my non-profit in a crowded space? How can we build more inclusive startups and get more women in tech? What strategies should we be utilizing to address harassment in tech that will actually make a difference? Her organization’s latest survey revealed that out of 350 women founders surveyed, 44% experienced harassment in tech.

You can ask all this and more to Allyson Kapin, CEO and founder of Women Who Tech and Rad Campaign, on January 9th. Allyson was part of the first wave of online advocacy experts, and her non-profit “brings together talented and renowned women breaking new ground in technology to transform the world and inspire change.” Her award-winning web agency RadCampaign.com has created digital marketing campaigns and websites for Planned Parenthood, the American Cancer Society, the Center for American Progress, and more.

In 2013, she co-authored the best-selling book Social Change Anytime Everywhere, a how-to for nonprofits looking to build advocacy and political power online.

If all this isn’t impressive enough, Allyson has also been named one of the “Most Influential Women in Tech” by Fast Company, a “Tech Titan” by the Washingtonian, and “one of the top 30 women entrepreneurs to follow on Twitter” by Forbes for her leadership roles in tech. Her campaigns have appeared on CNN, NPR, and The Daily Show with Jon Stewart

Need inspiration? Allyson is an experton building movements ranging from tackling the funding gap for female founders to building political power and merging online with real-world activism. Check out her Twitter here, and the recent story she wrote for TNW (“If diversity were a product, it would be considered a failure”) here.

Ask your questions now, and don’t forget to check back for her answers on January 9th!

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