Learn a second language during your morning commute with this $30 interactive app

Learn a second language during your morning commute with this $30 interactive app

Look, there’s no need to get political here. But Americans…we’ve got to start talking about what we’re teaching our kids.

Case in point — only 20 percent of American students, from kindergarteners through high school seniors, have learned a foreign language, according to the Pew Research Center. On the surface, that stat isn’t great — and it looks even worse when you consider more than 90 percent of European kids take foreign language training. In many cases, they’re even learning more than one non-native tongue.

No, we can’t change the entire U.S. educational system today. But while we Americans probably didn’t reach multilingual status as children, we can increase our job opportunities, expand our world-views and generally help understand our planet better by learning another language now. Or how about six — with this lifetime subscription to uTalk Language Education training, available now for only $29.99 (over 90 percent off) from TNW Deals.

uTalk’s innovative techniques help you learn real world vocabulary and syntax in the world’s most widely-spoken languages from your smartphone, tablet or other favorite device. The courses, led by native speakers and highlighted by insightful learning games, help you internalize fundamental words and phrases you can use in everyday situations. As your command of the language grows, uTalk even monitors your achievements to let you know how you’re doing.

You can choose any six of more than 130 languages to learn — and there’s no rush. Just pick one now and take…well, the rest of your life to choose five more. This limited time deal also gives you options, all with the same big savings: you can step down to learning just one language ($19.99) or throttle up to 22-language package ($99.99) or the motherlode, all 130 languages for only $299.99.

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