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This article was published on March 21, 2013

This guy is selling RSS.com for $200,000 to capitalize on Google Reader’s shutdown

This guy is selling RSS.com for $200,000 to capitalize on Google Reader’s shutdown Image by: Picasa 2.7
Robin Wauters
Story by

Robin Wauters

Robin Wauters is the European Editor of The Next Web. He describes himself as a hopeless cyberflâneur, a lover of startups, his family a Robin Wauters is the European Editor of The Next Web. He describes himself as a hopeless cyberflâneur, a lover of startups, his family and Belgian beer. If you'd like to know more about Robin, head on over to robinwauters.com or follow him on Twitter.

Very timely, given the impending shutdown of Google Reader, the most widely used RSS reader out there: the owner of the domain name RSS.com has decided to put it up for sale at a price of $200,000, The Next Web has learned.

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The current owner, entrepreneur and domainer Ron Sheridan, is said to have initially acquired RSS.com (update:for $125,000 plus, Sheridan informs us, a 10% buyer’s commission, bringing the total to $137,500) when he had plans to develop an RSS reading service combined with a crowdsourced RSS feed directory.

Those plans never came to fruition, and the broker of the domain name (WebsiteBrokerage.com) tells us that Sheridan essentially aims to capitalize on all the chatter about RSS after Google’s move to kill Reader.

Sheridan isn’t exactly new to the domain name game. He was previously a co-founder of Oversee.net, one of the largest domain companies, and is currently working on a startup called Pixt.com.

If no one bites at the $200,000 price, Sheridan hopes a suitable partner steps up to the plate, and he’s even supposedly running some sort of Kickstarter campaign to bring some action to the domain name.

Though the price is a bit steep in my opinion, it could be an opportunity for a startup determined to fill the void that will undoubtedly be left when Google Reader leaves the RSS stage.

Image credit: shizhao / Flickr