Samsung boasts about its Galaxy S III development secrets, wants to share them with you

Samsung boasts about its Galaxy S III development secrets, wants to share them with you

Launching last month, Samsung’s Galaxy S III was shrouded in secrecy for the most part, with little or no details of its handset leaking outside the company. Today, Samsung wants to tell the world everything it did to keep it a secret.

In a post entitled: “Don’t Bring Your Work Home..Ever!” Samsung says that it didn’t allow its senior engineers to share with family members that they were working on the Galaxy S III, utilised separate labs with security cards and fingerpint readers and limited access to only a select few.

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Samsung also developed three separate prototypes for the Galaxy S III, which were transported in security boxes and hand-delivered by Samsung representatives instead of third-party couriers, and antenna designs needed to be adapted for each individual prototype, making it “quite tiring and frustrating” for engineers working on the project.

Sounds very familiar, mirroring reports of a certain fruit-branded company. However, Apple doesn’t share its design and development secrets (although there have been a few bar-related incidents) or comment on them publicly.

It would be expected that most smartphone makers implement similar processes, ensuring trade secrets aren’t leaked before launch.

Overall, Samsung did a good job on keeping the device a secret. A prototype unit did leak out before the launch, but it didn’t come close to the final Galaxy S III design. Despite this, Samsung still came in for some criticism over its choice of design, which isn’t particularly unique for a device that was a year in the making.

It’s still on course to become the fastest selling Android smartphone of all time, boosting Samsung’s position in the smartphone market, at least until Apple unveils its next-gen iPhone.

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