Pro-Israeli hacker posts what he says are log-in details for 100,000 Facebook accounts

Pro-Israeli hacker posts what he says are log-in details for 100,000 Facebook accounts

While most of the attacks between Arab and Israeli hackers seem to have quietened down, a pro-Israeli hacker who goes by the name Hannibal has released log-in details of what he says are 100,000 Arab Facebook accounts.

Last night, Hannibal warned the public that he would be sharing unspecified new details soon, and today the log-in details emerged via his Pastebin account.

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From testing a number of the log-in details, all of which belonged to Malaysian Facebook users, a few of the password combinations were correct, but not all of them. Some accounts had been locked by Facebook because they had been previously accessed from unrecognized devices or locations.

He accompanied the log-in details with a message calling all Israeli hackers to bring an end to their attacks on Arab sites and accounts. The post, exactly as it appears on Pastebin, reads:

I post this 100k accounts list because i want show the my huge strength. The Arabs should learn a lesson and know not to mess with me.
Jewish people named me as the general of Israel’s hackers.
I have about 30 million email accounts, 10 million bank accounts, 4 million cerdit cards of Arabs from all over the world
I received thousands of emails from Arabs who are begging me to stop publishing their bills and hurt them.
Because I noticed that lately the Arab hackers are gone, I declare cyber war termination.
Israeli hackers, stop! Cyber war stops until further notice I will post again if they attack the State of Israel.
If they appear again, I again come to save Israel. Trust me. I’ll always be around.
Thanks, Hannibal.

Hannibal’s attack is the latest in a long string of attacks by both Israeli and Saudi Arabian hackers, in which targeted websites have included those belonging to the official Saudi Arabian, United Arab Emirates and Israeli stock exchange.

The year may be just a few weeks young, but already the stakes have increased with a number of cyber attacks taking place across the Middle East. You can keep up with how things have developed since January 3 with our comprehensive timeline of events.

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