Sperm delivery by mail? There’s an app for that

Sperm delivery by mail? There’s an app for that

When you think of the on-demand economy, I bet you imagine services like Amazon Prime, Uber and Postmates. The London Sperm Bank Donors think of sperm.

A new service, dubbed ‘Order a Daddy,’ lets users narrow down results from a sperm donor registry to find their ideal match. Browsing potential fathers is as easy as selecting a few desired characteristics and allowing the search function to do its work. Once finished, it’ll return names — such as ‘Donor 1000’ and ‘Donor 1004’ — with results detailing their physical characteristics. If it seems a good fit, a click of the ‘found out more’ link brings up additional information such as medical history, personality and a written description of personality characteristics.

One states: “Pleasant, charming and easy to get on with, this donor was a cheerful intellectual teeming with positivity,” while another reads: “He is a well-mannered, well-spoken and very likable individual.”

Donors run the gamut from doctors, lawyers and financiers to creatives, and nearly everything between.

In case you were wondering, the British app is legal and meets all the requirements of the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA), Britain’s in vitro fertilization regulator. Critics, however, pine that app-based selection trivializes parenthood.

Dr. Kamal Ahuja, scientific director of the London Sperm Bank disagrees.

You make all the transactions online, like you do anything else these days.

This allows a woman who wants to get a sperm donor to gain control in the privacy of her own home and choose and decide in her own time. We think this is the first of its kind in the world.

And once you find a prospective father? No worries; just complete a £950 payment through the app and the baby juice is delivered to your fertility clinic.

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