Qwertycards help you generate secure and easy to remember passwords

Qwertycards help you generate secure and easy to remember passwords

For most Web users, generating a strong and secure password for each site they visit is a foreign notion.

The easiest route for generating and storing these passwords is through use of a password manager like Lastpass, Keepass or 1Password, but Qwertycards could offer a nice alternative to those that still don’t trust password managers with sensitive data.

Qwertycards are wallet-sized cards that give you a unique cipher to use for creating strong passwords. Printed on each card is a QWERTY keyboard with substitutions for each key.

To generate a new password, users would use the base code at the bottom of the card, followed by a secret word of their choosing, but with the characters substituted for the cypher text on the card.

card_front_back

Using Qwerty cards is pretty simple:

Step 1: Type in the code letters shown on the ‘spacebar’ of the card

sh(/J3Hq

Step 2: Enter your own password or secret word

sh(/J3Hq******

Step 3: Type in the code characters for each letter of the website you are using. For example, with www.AMAZON.com use the code letters for AMAZON.

sh(/J3Hq******.u.rqf

It’s not a perfect option, but it’s a start. Qwerty cards are much better than your last name and the last two digits of your birth year, but again, a password manager is typically the more secure option, even when they get hacked.

No matter what you do, your password will probably never be as strong as this guy’s.

Qwertycards Is A Wallet-Sized Card That Generate Secure Passwords [TechCrunch]

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