Skype in the Classroom was launched by the now Microsoft-owned VoIP platform back in 2010, and was one of the company’s first forays into the education realm, aimed at helping like-minded teachers collaborate on projects and share resources.

Today, Skype has announced that it’s joining forces with Penguin Group, New York Philharmonic, Science Museum London, Peace One Day, and Save the Children with a view towards giving teachers educational content and access to expert speakers via video calling.

This collaboration represents Skype’s latest attempt to reach its goal of connecting one million classrooms globally. Skype in the classroom will now feature each organization’s content, projects and available guest-speakers, with Penguin Young Readers Group connecting authors with students for discussions about books, reading and writing. And The New York Philharmonic will offer live interaction with musicians and educators, kicking off with an exploration of Billy the Kid – the man and the legend – through the lens of Aaron Copland’s 1939 ballet.

Registered teachers will have the opportunity to link directly to the Skype-supported Peace One Day Global Education Resources and to educate their students about the importance of peace in the modern world. Students can also connect with its founder, Jeremy Gilley, and question him on his journey to institutionalize Peace Day, on 21 September.

Save the Children and London’s Science Museum will have individual projects on Skype in the classroom by the end of the year.

Skype in the Classroom currently has more than 28,000 registered teachers across 190 countries. Meanwhile, you may want to read our previous feature on how the Internet is revolutionizing education.

Skype in the Classroom