Hacker group LulzSec, it appears, is through with its “anarchic lulz”, announcing today via Pastebin (of course) that it’s quitting after fifty days of activity.

“For the past 50 days we’ve been disrupting and exposing corporations, governments, often the general population itself, and quite possibly everything in between, just because we could,” the group notes. “While we are responsible for everything that The Lulz Boat is, we are not tied to this identity permanently.”

“Our planned 50 day cruise has expired, and we must now sail into the distance, leaving behind – we hope – inspiration, fear, denial, happiness, approval, disapproval, mockery, embarrassment, thoughtfulness, jealousy, hate, even love.”

In the past fifty days, LulzSec has become a household name, hacking major targets including among its most notable victims  Sony and the US Senate. On Friday the group claimed in a BBC news interview to have received over $18,000 of donations. While the group has never been publicly identified, in its final statement it states it consists of a “crew of six”.

In its latest tweet, the group encourages anyone who wants to join the ‘AntiSec’ movement to turn to Anonymous.

If LulzSec is telling the truth and this really is the end, it’s gone out with what seems like a bang. A torrent file posted to The Pirate Bay points to a 457.84MB download which claims to contain information that includes AOL internal data, AT&T internal data and the “FBI being silly” among its contents. The full list is:

50 Days of Lulz.txt 2.64 KiB
booty/AOL internal data.txt 63.6 KiB
booty/AT&T internal data.rar 314.59 MiB
booty/Battlefield Heroes Beta (550k users).csv 24.67 MiB
booty/FBI being silly.txt 3.82 KiB
booty/Hackforums.net (200k users).sql 111.2 MiB
booty/Nato-bookshop.org (12k users).csv 941.8 KiB
booty/Office networks of corporations.txt 3.87 KiB
booty/Private Investigator Emails.txt 2.52 KiB
booty/Random gaming forums (50k users).txt 6.08 MiB
booty/Silly routers.txt 67.7 KiB

We’re in the process of downloading the data to verify its contents, but whether its final payload’s contents are accurate or not, it appears that LulzSec is bowing out having made enemies of governments and corporations alike. Of course, while the hackers may have quit, that won’t stop their enemies pursuing them.

UPDATE: We’ve listed the contents of the data dump in more detail here.