On the eve of its developer conference, Google today revealed a new statistic about its Google+ Sign-In feature. The company says that 40 percent of Android users, when prompted, accept to download an app over-the-air.

Seth Sternberg, the company’s Google+ Product Management Director, released a statement touting the news:

When we launched Google+ Sign-In, we wanted to bridge the gap between desktop and mobile by allowing web users to instantly download a site’s Android app with just one click using our over-the-air install feature. Since launch, we’re now finding that 40% of people who are offered to install a website’s mobile app, accept. This is a significant benefit for consumers, who can now easily access their favorite sites on the go, and developers, who are experiencing greater mobile usage.

Google+ Sign-In was released to compete against the likes of Facebook Connect and launched with 10 partners initially. When implemented, the service enabled developers to prompt users to download their app instead of viewing the content on the mobile browser. It also promotes sharing of data to Google’s social network.

The Google+ team has been rather busy over the past few days leading up to Google I/O, which starts tomorrow. Yesterday, the company announced a new offensive aimed at mobile users whereby it would pull together parts of its search engine with its social network. The goal would be to create a new feature aimed at promoting suggested articles and content to mobile Web visitors.

Mario Anima, a Google+ Product Manager, also revealed yesterday that there are more than 50 companies who have integrated the Google+ Sign-In feature who will be sharing their stories at the conference. Most recently, is SoundCloud.

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