Following the close of second day of Google I/O, the Mountain View-based Internet giant has wasted no time upping its efforts to bond with the developers as it introduced the Google Developers Academy and the Google Developers University Consortium.

The two programs that follow-up on the introduction of its real-time Google Developers University Consortium platform, last week. Together, the platforms are aimed at improving its relationships with the developer community worldwide, and further encouraging the creation of apps and services based on Google’s platforms.

The Google Developers Academy is aimed at fostering new talent and providing access and tutoring to Google platforms:

Google Developers Academy is a new program that provides training materials on Google technologies. Developers will learn and solidify their skills on many of our developer tools and APIs. We’ve launched with courses covering a variety of services like Google App Engine, Google Drive, YouTube, and our many advertising APIs. This is just the start, as we’ll add new lessons regularly.

The Developers University Consortium is a mentorship-like service, which helps academics exchange and share ideas and work:

Google Developers University Consortium is a collaborative community of academics who use Google’s tools and developer platforms for instruction and research. We are providing teachers and researchers with a platform to share their materials and communicate freely with other faculty worldwide. This is a great place for the academic community to make announcements about their work, highlight successes, publish research, exchange content, and share their enthusiasm and knowledge with each other.

Wesley Chun, of the Google developer relations team, says that the programs will “provide more learning tools and interaction platforms for the global community” which, he believes, will help “build the next generation of awesome apps.”

Though aimed at developers, Google has used I/O 2012 to make a number of product announcements and demos, including the unveiling of its Nexus 7 tablet computer, confirmation of the arrival of new Chromebooks in the US and UK and the release of iOS apps for Google Drive and its (long awaited) Google Chrome mobile browser.

There were a number of development-led announcement, and there’s also been time for some crazy stunts and lots of demos and chatter around Project Glass.

You can catch up with the must know details in our two wrap-up posts, stay tuned for more from the event from us here at TNW:

Image via Flickr /Danny Sullivan