Kindle for iPhone and iPad has received a nice little update today, adding the ability to add multi-colored highlights to a book, instead of the default yellow (or blue if in night mode).

The new update also encourages sharing on Twitter and Facebook when you finish a book. This is a carryover from the Kindle Fire which has had this ability for a while. The uptake for Amazon here is that it obviously shows other people who you’re using the Kindle app, but also drives sales of books that you might have liked and finished reading.

 Kindle for iOS gains more Kindle Fire features with post reading share and upsell screens, refreshed look

On the Kindle Fire there is a host of post-reading actions that you can take and this update brings more than just sharing over from Amazon’s tablet. There is also now a list of books that you might like as well, and you have the ability to add them to a wish list. You can’t buy them because of Apple’s policy around purchasing books inside the Kindle app on iOS, but adding them to a list will let you get at them from the website more easily.

There is also now a prompt that allows you to write your own review of the book when you’re done. In what is a nice bug fix, your brightness settings will now be saved across sleeps of your iOS device. This is handy for those of us that read primarily in bed at night and like to have the Kindle app display a relatively dim view.

IMG 1759 Kindle for iOS gains more Kindle Fire features with post reading share and upsell screens, refreshed look IMG 1761 Kindle for iOS gains more Kindle Fire features with post reading share and upsell screens, refreshed look

The new Kindle app for iPhone has also gotten a revamped book view, which displays a much more attractive progress bar and ‘new/download’ badges to indicate status.

Amazon recently updated Kindle for iOS to support X-Ray for books, something that it had previously kept for its own devices. This habit illustrates Amazon’s desire to be the broker of its content on any platform that’s available. Rather than hoarding features in order to drive up sales of its own hardware, which it makes next to no money  on.

 Kindle

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