Songkick announced today that over 100,000 new users have signed up to its service through the Songkick Concerts app on Spotify since  its launch last year.

Millions of personalized concert alerts have been sent to users who have registered through Spotify. Fans get an email when artists they are tracking in their Spotify library announce new shows nearby. So, Songkick users can find out first when their tracked artists are playing without having to sort through lists of bands that are not of interest.

Naturally Songkick is delighted with the numbers and hopes to continue to create more links for music lovers. Songkick CEO Ian Hogarth says:

“Songkick is working to build a deeper connection between artists and fans. We want more people to experience the thrill of seeing an amazing live show. We know how memorable a fantastic concert can be, and we’re on a mission to get people to see more live music. This is great news for bands too. With your music on Spotify and your concerts on Songkick, we’ll help get more fans to your shows wherever you are touring. Keep adding your tour dates to Songkick and we’ll keep moving them all over the web for you.”

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Information for 50,000 different concerts and festivals has already been sent to new users on Spotify’s platform. Part of the appeal is the broad range of musical tastes and venues that are catered to, from jazz quartets in coffee shops to big name acts in arena shows.

Spotify’s Director of Platform Sten Garmark noted that this integration is an enriching service for customers,

“Spotify is not just a place to listen to all the world’s music, but – thanks to apps like Songkick – it is also a great place to find out when and where your favorite artist will be playing live. More than 100,000 Spotify users now use the Songkick app to find out tour dates for their favorite artists, browse map and venue information, and click through to buy tickets. More music fans can get to more concerts with Songkick, which is good news for both fans of live music and for artists.”

It makes sense to directly link the logistics of performance bookings to music as it is played, though as Bobbie Johnson notes over on Giga Om today, there were some doubts when the process first started. It seems that the combination of sites and sounds in this case is the right one.